Head is almost over water

     
Some of the second and third year students I’ve interacted with regard this 3rd quarter of year 1 as the most grueling one (academically) in the program. Both Finance and Operations courses are fairly intense. The curriculum requirements include several problem sets and cases, other than the midterm and final exams. In fact since the weekday cohorts started 4 weeks ago, we’ll have our mid-term exams next week. The silver lining here is that we’re getting a preview of disciplines that are essential for the functioning of any organization. And, any aspiring business professional needs to be very comfortable with both of these.

The other day we had a Finance case on the Lockheed TriStar program. This multi-billion dollar defense project from 1970s ran into cost-overruns and had revenue projections which were fairly unrealistic. (This is just a plain text read of the case, not my expertise of analyzing multi-billion dollar boondoggles :-) ) You’d wonder that if it was evident to every MBA-student who’s solved this case in the past decade, then why Lockheed executives didn’t realize this. Of course, not everything is black-and-white. Some of these financially unacceptable ventures are green-lighted for socio-political and strategic reasons. I can’t help but draw comparisons with the current banking-bailout. But let’s leave that for some later time. Anyway, working on such real-life cases has been really exciting.

Btw, one month into the quarter, I finally understand this finance profession joke:

Said the epitaph of a naïve banker “He who lies here wanted all his relationships to be NPV positive”

Operations Management is no less interesting in principle (as I realized after working on an NYPD scheduling case problem). Have you ever felt that the other “queue” is faster while waiting for security checkin at an airport or standing in a line at Starbucks? All of this scheduling is (can be) done via complex scheduling models. And it was news to me that in the common case, having a single queue is faster than the multiple queues we see in our daily lives. A big part of this story is apparently, perception. One line appears to be too long and 5 small lines, while slower, give us the feeling of being served faster!

The summer quarter elective list was released recently. Taking classes in the summer may be an NPV positive decision and will certainly optimize scheduling for future semesters, but I am hoping that socio-psychological reasons will prevail in the end. And I will be able to spend the summer months re-introducing my “fun” side to friends and family. Wait, I dare not day-dream; it’s just too far to be real at this time.

- Div

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